Even more modular

Yet another font is in the works, right now it feels a bit like I’m working in a “pipeline” fashion making multiple fonts concurrently. My script font is basically finished (with some spacing and kerning issues to be addressed if it isn’t accepted on DaFont) and a link will be posted when it’s available on all the sites.

Kerning

I’ve been working on a script font for some time now, I finally got around to making the majuscules, numbers and punctuation, but I have to redo the kerning table.

THIS is why I prefer designing monospace fonts.

At least I’m gaining some experience in kerning and spacing.

Serifs

I’ve been working on a new font the past few days, it’s going to be yet another geometric font, this time it’ll have tall letters, serifs and a fairly rigid composition.

The majuscules, minuscules and numbers are pretty much done, but I’m having a bit of trouble getting started with the non-alphanumeric characters. As always, the ampersand and the at sign remain to be the most difficult of the special characters, I’m considering borrowing some from my earlier high stress font “High Society”.

Getting started with QuarkXPress

For far too long I’ve been doing layout work in Illustrator and Affinity Designer.

It’s not that it’s bad to do so, vector graphics applications have all the tools to create a single page poster, business card or some other things for print, but lately I’ve found I do work that spans over multiple pages where I need a consistent design – what I need are stylesheets and master pages.

So now that I do most of my design work on my mac and my Adobe CS5 package for Windows is getting a bit dated anyway I thought I’d learn the other “industry standard” application for desktop publishing: QuarkXPress.

Compared to other professional grade software and the fact that they have a few good offers I’m really pleased with getting a full fledged DTP-program. I tried the Open Source Scribus first, but it couldn’t do something so basic as to have master page elements in front of the background.

Now I’m using it to design menu items for websites and will probably use it for my résumé.

 

Logo, Website, WordPress and Menu Items

Designing logos and setting up websites is starting to get a routine.

Today I was asked by my boss to set up the website www.bellonordic.no, he had a few logo design suggestions and a general idea of the website layout.

It seems one of my earlier designs caught on since his new design suggestion hinted toward having three “mountains” in the background, so all I had to do was slightly alter my design, create a few alternative logos and I was done.

 

Then I had to set up the WordPress site. So I picked a theme, dug up some stock photos for menu items and used the art-boards to keep a consistent design.

I really wish Serif would release their upcoming desktop publishing tool “Affinity Publisher”, as much as I like Affinity Designer, I’d prefer to use more proper layout tools when doing layout work.

KML Contracting

A few years ago, back in 2015, I was contacted due to a texture I made earlier.

Apparently, the “diamond plate” pattern I made just for the fun of it proved to be a useful resource for multiple graphic designers and illustrators and Tina (as her name was) wanted to use it for a contracting company based in Pennsylvania called KML Contracting.

Since I wasn’t selling the texture at a stock website or anything I agreed for her to use the image as she liked free of charge as long as I was mentioned and got bragging rights as a designer.

So here it is, logo and everything (that is, I made the texture, Tina Andrews designed the logo):