Getting started with QuarkXPress

For far too long I’ve been doing layout work in Illustrator and Affinity Designer.

It’s not that it’s bad to do so, vector graphics applications have all the tools to create a single page poster, business card or some other things for print, but lately I’ve found I do work that spans over multiple pages where I need a consistent design – what I need are stylesheets and master pages.

So now that I do most of my design work on my mac and my Adobe CS5 package for Windows is getting a bit dated anyway I thought I’d learn the other “industry standard” application for desktop publishing: QuarkXPress.

Compared to other professional grade software and the fact that they have a few good offers I’m really pleased with getting a full fledged DTP-program. I tried the Open Source Scribus first, but it couldn’t do something so basic as to have master page elements in front of the background.

Now I’m using it to design menu items for websites and will probably use it for my résumé.

 

“The Norwegian type Scene”

As I googled my name as I do every now and then I found I was listed somewhere new and unexpected.

It seems someone is cataloguing type designers and typographers from all over the world and I’m listed as part of “the Norwegian type scene”, which is kind of a nice surprise.

Here’s another one of my many online profiles, perhaps the first I didn’t make myself:

http://luc.devroye.org/fonts-89827.html

 

More more more…

Two more fonts have been uploaded to my Font Designs page.

PiRad – an experiment in designing letters inscribed in a semi-circle.

Klub Katz – Much like my first Montebello-font, a simple thin font inspired by neon lights. This time I’ve chosen slab serifs and having “no closed paths”. The name is a reference to the works of John Dilworth.

Manos – the hands of font

This time, I thought I’d try and make a handwritten font.

What I did was:

  • Write the letters on a piece of grid paper.
  • Trace the letters onto plain white paper using a marker and a light table.
  • Scan the clean drawn letters to a jpeg file.
  • Auto-traced the jpeg into a pdf using the “Super Vectorizer” program.
  • Isolated the letters to individual curves using the boolean intersection operation.
  • Exported the letters to individual SVGs and imported them into FontForge as usual.

I did some small cleanup on the letters of course, but I haven’t bothered changing the sizes of the minuscules yet. I find too much “nitpicking” can be detrimental to productivity, so I try not to spend too much time on details at the moment.

The font can be downloaded here. Or you can fint it on my font designs page.

ManosPreview

A little Affinity Designer and FontForge How To

Here’s a screencast showing how to:

  • Find the baseline, ascender and descender of a font you designed.
  • Export the individual glyphs into an SVG somewhat efficiently.
  • Start a new FontForge document and set the ascender and descender accordingly.
  • Import the individual glyphs into FontForge.
  • Generate the Font and install it on in macOS.

There’s no sound, it’s just a 6 minute video showing how I do it.